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You can farm! Order your custom raised chickens today!

Keith moving beyond organic whole chickens on grass in chicken tractors on pasture.

Anyone can farm!  You may not have enough space or the ability to raise your own chickens or Thanksgiving turkey, but you can be a virtual farmer by having us custom raise your birds for you!  Let us know how many you want, and we’ll raise them for you, using GMO free feed and raising them out on pasture just like we always have.  We’ll do our best to raise them to the size you want, whether Cornish, 3.5-4.0 pound fryer size, or 4-5 pound roaster size. You can order any quantity of birds from 5-20 or more.  You are purchasing live birds and will need to arrange for processing.  You can take them to the processor of your choice.  If you choose our custom processing, we will process them as a courtesy.  We can cut them for you so you receive cuts if you want us to, though some fees may be added–the birds are custom raised for you, and you can get them the way you want (though some limitations apply).

Check out your options here in the store.

Here is some more information on how we raise our chickens:

Pasture plus Chickens

Taste the Love, or Why BGA chickens taste better than Tyson’s

You can check out the options in the store.  If you don’t see what you want, contact us!   Here are a couple of places to start:

Fryer Chicken Bundle

Family size Broiler chicken bundle

Reserve your chickens TODAY!

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Farming for Fun and Profit: a farmer’s winter thoughts

Mangalitsa pigs in the winter

It’s been a while since we’ve posted, but the farm continues to be busy.  The winter is quieter, more of a maintenance time, a reflective time.  So, is farming worth it?  Is it for fun, or for profit?  Hopefully the answer is “both.” Mark talks in this video about what we’ve learned about marketing and what it takes to raise Mangalitsas for both fun and profit.

Mark’s been making videos and you can check them out on our Baker’s Green Acres YouTube channel.

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Integrity Matters: know or learn to be your farmer

Keith moving beyond organic whole chickens on grass in chicken tractors on pasture.

“Trust is the combination of intelligence and integrity.”

“Husbandry, which is not replaceable by science, nevertheless uses science, and corrects it too. It is the more comprehensive discipline. To reduce husbandry to science, in practice, is to transform agricultural “wastes” into pollutants, and to subtract perennials and grazing animals from the rotation of crops. Without husbandry, the agriculture of science and industry has served too well the purpose of the industrial economy in reducing the number of landowners and the self-employed. It has transformed the United States from a country of many owners to a country of many employees.” ~Wendell Berry

This summer has been a new venture in food for us.  We are redesigning our business model.  We are assessing what’s important and what we can do without or outsource.  We are seeking to keep our business and life in integrity with our personal values and choices.  We increasingly find that there are aspects of where we live in the midst of big agriculture country are out of integrity with how we want to live.  The land, it’s soil, grasses, trees, and waters, are part of our lives.  They are a collective to be collaborated with, not brought into submission.  That’s been our approach to how we raise our food, be it squash or chicken, apples or pigs.  #IntegrityMatters.

Farming with the season is part of that integrity.  As we transition from summer to fall, we move out of chicken season and into pig season.  Chicken is a “cooling meat.”  It’s light and doesn’t tax a digestive system that is getting plenty of nourishment from the abundent veggies of summer. Grass fed poultry is full of the  nutrients of grass and contain a balance of Omega-3’s and 6’s as well as lots of vitamins A and E.  They aren’t so high in the vitamins so plentiful in the rich, dark veggies summer provides us.  As the grasses get frosted and the natural grains ripen, the grazing animals come ready for harvest.  The nutrition in the grasses goes to the roots, the animals harvest the grains, and the cold drives the animals’ fat into the muscles in preparation for winter.  The dry grasses help to dry out the fat, making it more storable and dense, Rrich with the stored nutrients of summer.  Fall and early winter are the time for harvesting these animals.  Historically, the flies were gone and the pastures done for the season at animal harvest time.  The crisp chill of fall would cool the carcasses of the pigs and cows so they could be processed.  This would be winter meat.  The rich red meat would help provide the iron and other vitamins and minerals lacking in the veggies of winter.  The seasons worked together and the farmer collaborated to make the most of what nature offered.

Now is the time to get your whole or half hog spoken for.  We are planning for our fall harvest as we look at the frost on the fields in the mornings and break out the sweatshirts and vests in the mornings and evenings.  We don’t have to worry about flies so much thanks to the wonders of refrigeration and fly spray, but it’s time to start thinking of hog harvest.

The Homestead Hog Harvest class is coming up in November.  There is still room for you!  This is a great weekend to experience the magic that happens when hogs are harvested with integrity and care–and you can take that skill set home with you!  From field to freezer, you can harvest a hog, or at least have the experience of doing it.  PLUS, you get to take some fabulous Mangalitsa pork home with you.

Integrity matters.  Know your farmer.  Anyone can farm!

Check out these articles for more farm philosophy:

Hay and Philosophy

Pasture (Grass) plus Chickens: goodness to share

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Soup for Supper: Using fresh veggies and thoughts on eating

“Fresh” is the definition of summer when it comes to food!  Seasonal eating is a very healthy way to live as it keeps you eating fresh food, helps you tune in to what nature is doing around you, and encourages you to contribute to the local economy.  We’ve always encouraged folks to eat fresh and local, even your meats.  There is a lot to be said for the known and unknown dynamics of “biosphere eating.”  But there’s also things to know about how the rhythm of the day affects your body and how to eat in accord with it.  Jill shares here how she’s preparing some fresh veggies for the soup for dinner and some philosophy on living with the daily and seasonal rhythms of nature.

Want to make bone broth?  Here’s a video with instructions:  Stir fry and Bone Broth

Here are some thoughts on winter gardening: Winter Gardening

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Spicy Chicken Rub: spice up that grilled chicken!

Grilled chicken, GMO free, pasture raised, free range

Spicy Chicken Rub: spice up that grilled chicken!

This past week we harvested most of this batch of chickens from the field.  The nutrients from the green grass make all the difference in the chicken.  We’ve had a lot of rain this summer and the grass is very rich.  This chicken tastes fabulous!  We like it without any added seasoning, especially if it’s cooked on the grill.  But, if you like a little seasoning on your birds, this recipe makes a great rub to spice things up.  It’s written for a whole roasted chicken, but works fine as a rub on chicken parts, too.

Spicy Chicken Rub
Prep Time
10 mins
Cook Time
2 hrs
Total Time
2 hrs 10 mins
 

Roasted whole chicken is easy as anything, and this rub will liven it up!  Easy and tasty!

Course: Main Course
Ingredients
  • 1 whole chicken, about 4 lb.s
  • 1 tbsp. sea salt
  • 2 tsp. paprika
  • 1 tsp. cayenne pepper (more or less, to taste)
  • 1 tsp. onion powder
  • 1 tsp. thyme, dried
  • 1 tsp. black pepper
  • 1/2 tsp. garlic powder
Instructions
  1. Combine all the spices in a bag or bowl.

  2. Rinse the chicken inside and out.  Rub the spices under the breast skin and on the skin of the whole bird.

  3. Place bird breast up in a covered pot (roasting pan or crock pot) and bake at 325 degrees for about 1 1/2 hours. Bird is done when the drum stick meat starts to pull away from the end of the bone, or the juices run clear when you poke the thigh.

  4. Enjoy!

Recipe Notes

This can be used on chicken parts as well!  Rub the mixed spices onto the parts.  Lay the parts flat in a baking dish.  Bake at 325 degrees for about 1 hour.